Exalpha Biologicals, Inc.

Accelerating the Pace of Discovery

Product Highlight

Mouse anti-M13 phage coat protein g8p

Antibodies recognising M13 filamentous phage coat proteins are instrumental in the selection and detection of phages expressing specific antibody fragments or peptide sequences at their surface. The monoclonal antibodies manufactured and supplied by Exalpha react with either the pIII (g3p) or pVIII (g8p) proteins of M13 filamentous bacteriophage. All antibodies are available in a purified format. The antibodies are fully validated and are suitable for a wide range of techniques including:

  • ELISA
  • Flow Cytometry
  • Western Blot
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Immunoprecipitation
For more information, click here for our M13 Bacteriophage information page.

News

Two more of our excellent products have been published by PubMed:

Potential actionable targets in appendiceal cancer detected by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and mutational analysis
Borazanci, E., et al., J. Gastrointest. Oncol., 8, 164-172 (2017)
Using Exalpha SPARC Antibody (Cat. No. X1867P)

Molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological interactions of the protein kinase C-β inhibitor enzastaurin and erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer cells
Steen, N.V., et al., Am. J. Cancer Res., 7, 816-830 (2017)
Using Exalpha's FITC labeled anti PY20 Antibody (Cat. No. X1017)

Secondary Antibodies from Exalpha Biologicals

Secondary antibodies are valuable biological tools that are employed extensively in research applications and diagnostic assays. Secondary antibodies are conjugated to reporter molecules, such as enzymes or fluorochromes, which provide a signal that can be detected and measured. They are commonly used in antibody based applications to detect an antigen specific primary antibody that is not already conjugated to a reporter. Applications that may require a secondary antibody include immunohistology, immunofluorescence, western blotting, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), flow cytometry and lateral flow assays. Careful selection of suitable secondary antibodies also allows researchers to perform simultaneous labelling of multiple targets in a single sample.

A diverse range of monoclonal (Mab), polyclonal (PAb) secondary antibodies are available that vary according to the host, in which the antibody was raised. They are also grouped according to characteristics of the primary antibody recognised with respect to animal species, antibody class and region of the antibody. Secondary antibodies may also be supplied as whole antibodies or as antibody fragments, which can provide technical advantages in some applications.

In addition, antibodies can be conjugated to numerous different reporter molecules thus providing researchers and assay developers with enormous application and assay design flexibility. The correct selection of an appropriate secondary antibody is vital to the success of any immunostaining technique.

Exalpha manufacture and supply polyclonal secondary antibodies that have been raised in goats and are specific for the Fc portion of mouse IgG. The secondary antibodies recognise all subclasses of mouse IgG and are available conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC). The antibodies are suitable for use in immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and ELISA applications.

GAM/IgG(Fc)/FITC Goat anti Mouse IgG1 IgG2a IgG2b IgG3 (Fc specific), conjugated with FITC
GAM/IgG(Fc)/TRITC Goat anti Mouse IgG1 IgG2a IgG2b IgG3 (Fc specific), conjugated with TRITC

In addition, Exalpha offers an extensive range of high quality polyclonal secondary antibodies that are suitable for the detection of mouse and rat immunoglobulin classes and subclasses. The range includes secondary antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, biotin, FITC or TRITC. The antibodies have been tested for Ig cross reactivity and are designed for use in a wide range of research applications.

Sample Images


Figure1: GAM/IgG(Fc)/FITC was used in a 1:100 dilution on swine colon, in combination with the primary monoclonal antibody to vimentin, RV202 (MUB1900P), used in a 1:1000 dilution. The green staining shows the connective tissue cells, while the blue color is DAPI staining for DNA (cell nuclei). As expected, no staining is seen in the epithelial cells of the intestinal crypts.


Figure1: GAM/IgG(Fc)/TRITC was used in a 1:40 dilution on swine colon, in combination with the primary monoclonal antibody to vimentin, RV202 (MUB1900P), used in a 1:1000 dilution. The red staining shows the connective tissue cells, while the blue color is DAPI staining for DNA (cell nuclei). As expected, no significant staining is seen in the epithelial cells of the intestinal crypts.

Figure2: GAM/IgG(Fc)/FITC was used in a 1:100 dilution on swine colon, in combination with the primary monoclonal antibody to vimentin, RV202 (MUB1900P), used in a 1:1000 dilution. The green staining shows the connective tissue cells, while the blue color is DAPI staining for DNA (cell nuclei). As expected, no staining is seen in the epithelial cells of the intestinal crypts.


Figure2: GAM/IgG(Fc)/TRITC was used in a 1:40 dilution on swine colon, in combination with the primary monoclonal antibody to vimentin, RV202 (MUB1900P), used in a 1:1000 dilution. The red staining shows the connective tissue cells, while the blue color is DAPI staining for DNA (cell nuclei). As expected, no significant staining is seen in the epithelial cells of the intestinal crypts.